GringoPost | Ecuador: BodyWorks discovering Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) Mike Coffey

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BodyWorks discovering Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) Mike Coffey

Are you stretching the right way?

Did you know that science has shown that if you hold your stretches for more than 3 seconds before you exercise you are 30% weaker than if you didn't stretch at all.

How Does Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) Work
So how does AIS differ from the myriad of modalities available for aches, pains and greater athletic performance?

There are three main principles of AIS that will help you understand this method of flexibility.

First, active isolated stretching uses your body's own laws to facilitate the results I am speaking of. The stretches are held for only 1.5-2 seconds, and are completed in repetitions.

The reason for this is that when a stretch is held for longer than two seconds, a protective mechanism called "myotatic stretch reflex" is triggered. This reflex happens in your body under many normal circumstances. However, in elite performance, injury rehabilitation or the desire to instill lasting changes in the body, this reflex is undesirable.

The aforementioned is true because when the myotatic stretch reflex is initiated (by holding stretches for more than approx. 2.5-3 seconds), the muscle being stretched will begin to contract, creating what is known as an eccentric contraction - something we do not want to happen.

Allowing the myotatic stretch reflex to occur while stretching causes oxygen to be depleted from the tissue being stretched. Reduction of oxygen is the opposite of what you want to happen in a rehabilitation or performance situation.

Secondly, the stretches performed in this technique are "active"-- meaning the person being stretched actually helps move their own body part with their own muscles, before any assistance with a rope (if done alone) or a therapist (if treated by therapist) is initiated.

This active movement causes "reciprocal inhibition" (Sherrington's law). Simply put, when a muscle contracts, another muscle called the "antagonist" (the opposite) muscle is shut off.

The perfect environment to stretch a muscle is when it is relaxed. Active Isolated Stretching achieves this concept with every stretch.

I've been working in this field since the 90’s I have trained in a wide variety of therapies including Massage Therapy, Neuromuscular Therapy, Myofascial Release, Deep Tissue Bodywork, Reflexology, and Active Isolated Stretching. I have spent many years developing an integrated technique and unique philosophy of pain relief.

I also work with an array of conditions including:

• Spinal pain and injuries (e.g. disc prolapse)
• Headaches
• Sports injuries (e.g. ligament tears)
• Fractures (e.g. broken arm)
• Musculoskeletal problems (e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome)
• Post- surgical rehabilitation (e.g. following a knee replacement)
• Biomechanical problems (e.g. “flat feet”)
• Arthritic conditions (e.g. osteoarthritis)
• Neurological disorders and diseases (e.g. stroke)
• Cardiothoracic conditions (e.g. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorders)
• Pediatric conditions (e.g. cerebral palsy)

This is just to name a few.

I am extensively trained in manual therapy which means I am “hands on” with my clients. This may include massage and joint mobilization and manipulation, as well as muscle stretching which we achieve using a wide variety of techniques. To complement manual skills, I sometimes make use of different modalities to reduce pain and inflammation including Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) Active Release Techniques (ART) Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT) and trigger point therapy is also widely practiced. AIS practitioners are highly trained in exercise prescription and often give clients exercises to do at home to help resolve their conditions.

Find out for yourself how good you can feel.

Active Isolated Stretching (AIS)
Active Release Techniques (ART)
Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT)
Massage, Deep Tissue Massage, Sports Massage
Reflexology

Web Page: dobodyworks.wixsite.com/bodyworks

Don Bosco y Fernando de Argon.

BodyWorks: dobodyworks@gmail.com