GringoPost | Ecuador: The importance of stretching

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The importance of stretching

It's not enough to build muscle and achieve aerobic fitness. You need to think about flexibility, too.
You may think of stretching as something performed only by runners or gymnasts. But we all need to stretch in order to protect our mobility and independence. "A lot of people don't understand that stretching has to happen on a regular basis. It should be daily.

Why it's important

Stretching keeps the muscles flexible, strong, and healthy, and we need that flexibility to maintain a range of motion in the joints. Without it, the muscles shorten and become tight. Then, when you call on the muscles for activity, they are weak and unable to extend all the way. That puts you at risk for joint pain, strains, and muscle damage.

For example, sitting in a chair all day results in tight hamstrings in the back of the thigh. That can make it harder to extend your leg or straighten your knee all the way, which inhibits walking. Likewise, when tight muscles are suddenly called on for a strenuous activity that stretches them, such as playing tennis, they may become damaged from suddenly being stretched. Injured muscles may not be strong enough to support the joints, which can lead to joint injury.

Regular stretching keeps muscles long, lean, and flexible, and this means that exertion won't put too much force on the muscle itself. Healthy muscles also help a person with balance problems to avoid falls.

Where to start

With a body full of muscles, the idea of daily stretching may seem overwhelming. But you don't have to stretch every muscle you have. "The areas critical for mobility are in your lower extremities: your calves, your hamstrings, your hip flexors in the pelvis and quadriceps in the front of the thigh." Stretching your shoulders, neck, and lower back is also beneficial. Aim for a program of daily stretches or at least three or four times per week.

The cumulative effect of stretching

Stretching once today won't magically give you perfect flexibility. You'll need to do it over time and remain committed to the process. "It may have taken you many months to get tight muscles, so you're not going to be perfectly flexible after one or two sessions," "It takes weeks to months to get flexible, and you'll have to continue working on it to maintain it."

I've been working in this field since the 90’s I have trained in a wide variety of therapies including Massage, Neuromuscular Therapy, Myofascial Release, Deep Tissue Bodywork, Reflexology and Active Isolated Stretching, I have spent many years developing an integrated technique and unique philosophy of pain relief.

Are you in pain?
If you are going to a therapist and keep going back for relief, it’s not working.
I've been working in this field since the 90’s I have trained in a wide variety of therapies including Massage, Neuromuscular Therapy, Myofascial Release, Deep Tissue Bodywork, Reflexology and Active Isolated Stretching, I have spent many years developing an integrated technique and unique philosophy of pain relief.

I can get you pain free, with more flexibility more stability and more balance in a very short amount of time, with long lasting pain relief.

I also work with an array of conditions including:
• Spinal pain and injuries (e.g. disc prolapse)
• Headaches
• Sports injuries (e.g. ligament tears)
• Fractures (e.g. broken arm)
• Musculoskeletal problems (e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome)
• Post-surgical rehabilitation (e.g. following a knee replacement)
• Biomechanical problems (e.g. “flat feet”)
• Arthritic conditions (e.g. osteoarthritis)
• Neurological disorders and diseases (e.g. stroke)
• Cardiothoracic conditions (e.g. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorders)
• Paediatric conditions (e.g. cerebral palsy)

This is just to name a few.

I am extensively trained in manual therapy which means I am “hands on” with my clients. This may include massage and joint mobilization and manipulation, as well as muscle stretching which we achieve using a wide variety of techniques. To complement manual skills I sometimes make use of different modalities to reduce pain and inflammation including Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) Active Release Techniques (ART) Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT) and trigger point therapy is also widely practiced. AIS practitioners are highly trained in exercise prescription and often give clients exercises to do at home to help resolve their conditions.

There are several other benefits that occur by using AIS.
Because your brain and nervous system are engaged in every movement, there is neuromuscular re-education occurring as the repetitions are done. Every time a new range of motion is achieved, new neural pathways are produced.

For athletes, Power= Strength + Flexibility + Time.
A muscle cannot be trained to its end range if maximum range of motion is not achieved. By using repetitions, great amounts of lymph are moved through your body. This is of great benefit in wound and injury healing, as well as detoxification of your body.

Additionally, the benefits of AIS can result in an enhanced immune system, as well as improved feeling of well-being because of increased flexibility.

There are many reasons to be, or become flexible. Your daily activities will be enhanced by having a more supple, movable body. Personally, I find it to be the most critical aspect of well-being. If you cannot move well, all activities, fitness endeavors, strength training, and general health can be compromised.

If you have any of the injuries or conditions listed above, a consultation with BodyWorks is a step in the right direction!

Active Isolated Stretching (AIS)
Active Release Techniques (ART)
Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT)
Deep Tissue Massage
Reflexology

Web Page: dobodyworks.wixsite.com/bodyworks
Facebook: www.facebook.com/DoBodyWorks

BodyWorks: dobodyworks@gmail.com